IF_UNTITLED

NEW FORMS OF REMEMBRANCE FOR THE VICTIMS

Project type

URBAN COMPETITION

Location

MUNICH GERMANY

Collabs

SHARONE LIFSCHITZ

Client

CITY OF MUNICH

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NEW FORMS OF REMEMBRANCE FOR THE VICTIMS OF NATIONAL SOCIALISM IN MUNICH 2008

Working together with artist Sharone Lifschitz who was invited by the city of Munich to take part in the competition "New forms of remembrance for the victims of National Socialism" (known for "Speaking Germany" project in Munich 2007) we began our exploration of Munich and it’s citizens by devising a way to experience something of the relation of the citizens towards their city - its fabric, history and existing memorials. We conducted a workshop for young local people that gave rise to individual temporary memorials (paper and bamboo constructions), placed in key locations in the city and commemorating a particular person or group of individuals. From the workshop we carried forward three major notions: first, that our proposal should involve young Munich citizens as creative decision makers; second, that the memorial should draw on the great love of the people of Munich for their public spaces; and lastly, that the memorial should be temporary and parasitical. Our shortlisted proposal consists of a sequence of five or more temporary, yearlong disappearances of city landmarks, each commemorating a specific person or group of people. The absences could include a few columns of the facade of the National Theatre, the much-loved view of the pond and the Japanese Pagoda in the English Garden, or one of the lucky lions in front of the Royal Residence. Each disappearance is to be decided on by a group of young Munich citizens in an annual workshop. By making a direct link between the suddenly obscured city entity and a particular individual or group persecuted, this proposal aims at challenging not only the debate surrounding the placing of an appropriate memorial, but also the historical reluctance of citizens and politicians to "sacrifice" a particular public space for the erection of a memorial that disrupts the enjoyment of the public place. "What does it mean", we asked, "for a city like Munich deliberately to go about creating absences in its urban fabric? Creating losses of time? Setting out consciously to return to a state of incompleteness in remembrance of its lost citizens?"